Louis, from Guatemala, living in New York, says he is “the luckiest guy alive”

Featured in Humans of New York:

“My parents brought me from Guatemala when I was fourteen. Immigration wasn’t as big of a deal back in the 70’s. When I got to New York, I joined a soccer team with players from ten different countries. And you could just go to work and nobody asked any questions. My mother worked as a housekeeper at the Hilton for forty years. I was lucky. I didn’t have too hard of a time. I got to come over on a plane. But today it’s different. Right now, as we speak, people are hiding in bushes by the border. They’re running through deserts and swimming across rivers just to feed their families. I feel very bad for them. Things are very tough for the Latino immigrant. But it’s our turn. The last one to arrive has to pay for the broken dishes. You’ve got to blame somebody for the problems. It’s been like that since the first Thanksgiving. First it was the Irish, then the Polish, then the Italians. When the war came it was the Japanese. It’s just our turn. I’ve considered myself an American since I was born. I was born in Central America so that makes me an American—you guys even try to claim the name! I love the Yankees, the Giants, and the Mets. But it’s not too important what you call me. I’m just Louis, from Guatemala, living in New York. And I’m the luckiest guy alive.”

 

 

Photograph from Humans of New York: http://www.humansofnewyork.com/post/147612261871/my-parents-brought-me-from-guatemala-when-i-was

Photograph from Humans of New York: http://www.humansofnewyork.com/post/147612261871/my-parents-brought-me-from-guatemala-when-i-was